Italian Skiing - Insights

Spring Skiing and the 'Pasquali" Tradition in Bormio

Easter-BormioFor those planning their 2015 ski holiday in the Northern hemisphere why not considering travelling during the Easter break and if you love skiing there is no better period in the Italian Alps: snow abounds, the days are longer and warmer, and the villages are getting ready for the biggest celebration of the year, Easter.

If you are after more than great skiing for your next holiday on the snow, and look for culture, ancient traditions and real Italian atmosphere, then Bormio in Alta Valtellina, Italy should be on your “to visit” list....

 

Easter-Bormio

For those planning their 2015 ski holiday in the Northern hemisphere why not considering travelling during the Easter break and if you love skiing there is no better period in the Italian Alps: snow abounds, the days are longer and warmer, and the villages are getting ready for the biggest celebration of the year, Easter.

If you are after more than great skiing for your next holiday on the snow, and look for culture, ancient traditions and real Italian atmosphere, then Bormio in Alta Valtellina, Italy should be on your “to visit” list.

On Easter Sunday, the streets and piazzas of Bormio, become the unique stage for the ancient tradition of Pasquali. In the morning the villagers, young and old alike, dress in their traditional costume and gather together for a spectacular parade along the pedestrian area of the historic centre.

During the parade the Pasquali – religious themed floats created under extreme secrecy during the winter by local groups belonging to the five ancient neighbourhoods of Bormio – are carried on shoulders to the main square where they get judged based on criteria such as religious meaning, artistic value and craftsmanship. The one with most points wins glory and financial rewards. And as typical in Italy, enthusiastic participation from locals and guests is encouraged.

This unique tradition is believed to stem from ancient pagan rituals when a sacrificial lamb was offered to the gods. With the advent of Christianity it then evolved into the presentation and blessing of five – one for each neighbourhood – live lambs, written testimony of which can be found as early as 1606. It reached its present form in 1932.

Today it is part of the DNA of the town as much as skiing and the Roman thermal baths. So, why not planning a visit next Easter on 5th April 2015.